Unwordy Analysis: Can You Identify Authors by Their Punctuation?

Can you identify who wrote a big chunk of text, if you remove all the words and examine only the punctuation. This new study says that in many cases yes, you can: “Pull Out All the Stops: Textual Analysis Via Punctuation Sequences,” Alexandra N.M. Darmon, Marya Bazzi, Sam D. Howison, and Mason Porter, SocArXiv. January […]

Abulziement and Abusion

Abulziement and Abusion can each be found in James B. Montgomerie-Fleming‘s Notes on Jamieson’s Scottish Dictionary,  published by W. Hodge in 1899. Here is a photograph of Major James B. Montgomerie-Fleming displaying his knees. This photo was taken during Major Montgomerie-Fleming’s lifetime. One might note that Major Montgomerie-Fleming’s left and right hands are not displayed:

Kinda Sorta Linguistic Research

If you ever say “kinda” or “sorta”, there’s a good chance you’ve been using ‘Pragmatic Halos’ without even knowing about it. Linguistically speaking, ‘Pragmatic Halos’ can include phrases that are not strictly true (but that are neither lies or mistakes) and which are a normal part of honest, error-free discourse. “It is a truism that […]

Professor D’Arcy on like a contemporary vernacular

“The selective attention paid to the language of adolescents has led to the enduring belief that young people are ruining the language and that, as a consequence, the language is degenerating. One feature of contemporary vernaculars that is often held up as exemplification of these ideological principles is like, the ‘much-deplored interjection… that peppers the […]

Plain-words challenge: Wedding Words

Today’s challenge is to translate a paragraph into clear language that anyone can understand. This paragraph appears in the study “Consumption as common sense: Heteronormative hegemony and white wedding desire,” by Patricia Arend [pictured here], published in the journal Journal of Consumer Culture [vol. 16, no. 1, 2016, pp. 144-163]: “[This] article examines the white wedding desires […]

SIL e-Books – the bees’ knees for rhyming jingles (linguistics study)

If you’re after in-depth information about hanky panky, tittle tattle, or even argy bargy then where better to look than the pages of SIL e-Books ? In particular, chapter 16 of ‘A Mosaic of languages and cultures: studies celebrating the career of Karl J. Franklin*‘ – ‘Helter skelter and ñugl ñagl: English and Kalam Rhyming […]