Cheek preferences on Instagram’s chimpanzee pics [new study]

When people post pictures of chimpanzees to Instagram®, do they have a preference for choosing pictures which display the chimp’s right cheek – or the left cheek? Dr Annukka Lindell, who is a senior lecturer in psychology at the Department of Psychology and Counselling, School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia, […]

The Elephant in the Image [new study]

Can state-of -the-art visual analysis software always be relied on to find the elephant in an image? Akshay Raj Dhamija and colleagues at the VAST lab (Vision And Security Technology) at the Department of Computer Science, at University of Colorado, at Colorado Springs, US. have recently investigated the robustness of automated elephant detector systems. The team […]

Looking at Tyrells potato crisp packets (image ecology study)

  Within the academic field of aesthetics, there aren’t all that many essays written   on   about potato crisp packets. There is, however, at least one. Karin Wagner, who is professor and associate head of department for research in art history and visual studies at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, specialises in the areas […]

Untrained modern youths and ancient masters in self(ie) portraits

What do modern youths and ancient masters have in common? One possible commonality is they way they depict themselves in self portraits – specifically whether they tend to prefer giving preference to their left cheek or the right one. “[…] a set of selfies and wefies by modern youths reveals comparable biases to self-portraits and […]

‘Reversed Paintings’ (Possibilizations for Thing-Theorists)

Before considering the history and implications of reversed paintings, we need a definition – and we have one provided by Richard Read, who is Winthrop Professor in Art History at the University of Western Australia. “I define the reversed painting as a painting of a painting reversed against the spectator.” Professor Read is writing in […]

Podcast #33: Make sure colonoscopy patients will not explode

Chimpanzees recognizing photographs of the rear ends of other chimpanzees;  colonoscopy patients who explode, and the patent for the bagel-making machine — all these all turn up in this week’s Improbable Research podcast. Click on the “Venetian blinds” icon — at the lower right corner here — to select whichever week’s episode you want to hear: SUBSCRIBE on Play.it, iTunes, or Spotify […]