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Achievements in pepper spicelessness: First the jalapeno, now the habanero

Eighteen years after the creator of the spiceless jalapeno pepper was awarded an Ig Nobel Prize, a different plant-breeding scientist has achieved spicelessness in a different variety of chile pepper, say reports.

Dr. Paul Bosland, director of The Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University, was awarded the 1999 Ig Nobel biology prize for breeding a spiceless jalapeno chile pepper.

Today, in 2017, NPR’s “The Salt” blog reports about the new, second-spiceless-pepper, achievement:

This Heatless Habanero Packs All Of The Flavor With None Of The Burn

[A] pepper — an aromatic, orange habanero without any heat…

“We selected the habanero for heat because that’s what was coveted. But what if you wanted to experience the melon-like experience of a pepper?” Barber asks. “You can’t do it with a habanero — you can with a Habanada.”

Cornell plant breeder Michael Mazourek created the Habanada as part of his doctoral research. He got the idea after discovering a rogue heatless pepper whose genetics behaved very differently from a naturally sweet pepper like the Bell.

The man behind the Habanada is a Cornell University plant breeder named Michael Mazourek, who created it as part of his doctoral research….

 

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